That sweet, sweet feeling

cuppacoffeeFebruary. The shortest month is more than halfway through. When I was a child, I remember February as a blessedly short passage through the dark doldrums of a seemingly unending Midwestern winter. February “sagged and dragged.” We buckled down on our homework, caught up on our reading, and stayed inside to clean out closets and drawers. In more modern times, our culture disdains any “down time.” In the post-modern February, we are inundated with cuteness. From the adorable and furry rodentian weather-watcher, to the flying weaponized baby, February now pulls its weight on the calendar with two credible reasons to party down. The movie “Groundhog Day” inspires weekend watch parties, and Valentine’s Day is filled with dinner dates and chocolate. I admit it, I indulged! And yesterday, I contemplated where we get our sweetness in life.

Last week, I traveled to Fort Worth to share the Feldenkrais Method with undergraduate and graduate students in a conservatory-style music department. Outstanding singers, pianists, and instrumentalists experienced the ease of movement and release of unnecessary muscular effort that many observe after a Feldenkrais session. Their music-making became more expressive, more beautiful, more accurate, and more sustainable. They were fascinated by the idea that the Feldenkrais Method has nothing to do with music; just as it has nothing to do with back pain relief, or sports, or individuals with special-needs. I explained that the Method is about LIVING. Living life with a sense of freedom and agency, the ability to create positive change in one’s own habits, the discovery of new possibilities for enjoyment and expression – THAT is (part of) what the Feldenkrais Method is “for,” or “about.” As a teacher, it is sweet indeed to witness the changes that occur in my students’ quality of life: whether that means playing better, walking without pain or restriction, finding more energy for daily living, or simply FEELING more capable in something that is important to them. A ripple-effect then travels throughout, potentially improving relationships, surroundings, and communities. Life itself can indeed be sweet.

The Feldenkrais Method is not all sweetness and fun (although it has a lot of both!). Like life, sometimes it also includes challenge, confusion, and frustration. Our little movement laboratory allows us to experiment with low-level difficulties, like internal puzzles. As we successfully surmount these mini-obstacles through creative and gentle means, over time we develop the skill and perseverance to stick with solution-seeking when faced with bigger challenges.

If these ideas resonate with you, if they strike a chord of recognition within, if they pique your curiosity – then it might be time to return to a Feldenkrais lesson, class, or workshop in the near future – or to try one for the first time! We look forward to seeing you at any of our upcoming opportunities. Here’s to more sweets for the sweet!

New Year, New You


The New Year offers the promise of a new start, a blank slate, and a fresh hope that MAYBE we’ll “get it right” this year. Since 99% of us will abandon those resolutions before Valentine’s Day, perhaps your strategy for self-improvement could stand a new approach.

The Feldenkrais Method® offers a counter-intuitive approach to self-improvement. It is in accord with an old proverb that says, “Only when I accept myself completely as I am, am I completely free to change.”

Self-acceptance is not rationalization, where you lie to yourself that your behavior is OK. Self-acceptance is the willingness to look at the truth and acknowledge it. It takes ongoing self-awareness to notice when the time is ripe for positive change, and when the way is blocked. Your Feldenkrais classes can be the foundation for new self-awareness, from the inside out. Feldenkrais classes “upgrade” the connection and communication between your brain and your body, using movement — the native language of your entire nervous system.

You’ll be amazed at what can change.

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